dsgn

ain't graphic design
  1. In the dark: the internet sparked a revolution, then it was turned off

    Seven years, 60 countries, 935 internet shutdowns: How authoritarian regimes found an off switch for dissent.

    restofworld.org
  2. How to Commit Murder Inside a Locked Room

    Few genres are more preposterous than the locked room mystery. The premises are absurd and plot solutions ridiculous—but still I keep on reading.

    tedgioia.substack.com
  3. ‘Teletubbies’ Was a Fever Dream, But the Weirdest Parts Happened Off-Set

    The story of ‘Teletubbies’ is anything but innocent

    melmagazine.com
  4. The Greatest Unsolved Heist in Irish History

    Scandal, conspiracy, and cover-ups in the theft of the “Irish Crown Jewels” from Dublin Castle.

    atlasobscura.com
  5. How Out Run changed video games forever

    Out Run hit arcades 35 years ago this month. Its influence is still being felt on consoles, in music, and in movies

    wired.co.uk
  6. Why are hyperlinks blue?

    The internet has ingrained itself into every aspect of our lives, but there’s one aspect of the digital world that I bet you take for granted. When a co-worker casually asked me why links are blue, I was stumped.

    blog.mozilla.org
  7. No Laughing Matter? What the Romans Found Funny

    The structure of many jokes today bear a striking resemblance to their ancient counterparts, and many modern comedies mine character traits that are very similar to the popular stock types of ancient comedy.

    antigonejournal.com
  8. 700,000 lines of code, 20 years, and one developer: How Dwarf Fortress is built

    Dwarf Fortress is one of those oddball passion projects that’s broken into Internet consciousness.

    stackoverflow.blog
  9. On the Trail of a Mysterious, Pseudonymous Author

    Late last spring, a strange, beguiling novel began arriving, in installments, in the mail. Who had written it?

    newyorker.com
  10. Love in the Time of Cryptography

    Most romances today have deep digital footprints. This one didn’t — and to the state, that was a problem.

    wired.com